November 2017
S M T W T F S
« Feb    
 1234
567891011
12131415161718
19202122232425
2627282930  

About Us

Welcome to the Brookston family blog. We'll post updates here on what's going on in our part of the world, and especially with our son, Porter, who has been diagnosed with some form of autism. Our hope is that this blog will help us deal with all the issues we'll be facing and keep our friends and family informed as well.

Jay B.


Sarah J.


Porter Brookston
born September 10, 2001


Alice Brookston
born July 7, 2004

Listed on:



    Who's Your Favorite Brookston?

    View Results

January 26, 2007

The Brewery Museum at Cantillon

Categories: Photos, J, Friends, Beer, Trips — J @ 10:41 pm

Our first stop upon arriving in Brussels on Friday was a tour of the Brasserie Cantillon.

Brasserie Cantillon, the last remaining brewery in Brussels proper, is located in a dicey area of town, in the southern part near the Midi train station. It’s an unassuming building that belies the treasures that await the visitor inside.

Inside is the tasting area and the brewery offices, in, of course, the same building since 1900.

Where we enjoyed our first Cantillon of the day. From left: Thomas, Christian, Motor and Shaun.

Cantillon owner Jean-Pierre Van Roy with Shaun Christian and our tour guide, Yvan De Baets.

An old, no-longer used bottler is on display in the tasting area.

This old, still-used contraption looks like it could fly away.

The styles of beer Cantillon makes use old hops to keep their bittering qualities restrained, usually around three years old.

The mash tun on the second floor.

Inside the kettle.

The grain mill.

The grain itself is stored one floor up, in the dry attic.

Where there’s also an old hand bottling machine.

Another half floor above the attic is where all the magic happens, in the shallow square copper cooling tun.

Where slatted windows are adjusted to allow spontaneous fermentation.

Then the beer is stored in wooden casks of oak or chestnut for up to three years.

Where individual codes are put on each barrel to indicate what and when is inside.

A sign in one of the barrel rooms reads “Le temps ne respecte pas ce qui se fait sans lui,” which translates as “time does not respect what is done without him.”

This barrel, for example, is a Lambic (L), and was part of the 13th batch (13) done during the brewing season over years 2005-06 (I).

Inside one of the barrels that’s been aging over a year.

After bottling, they are racked tightly against the wall for further aging.

Yvan pours Thomas the Rose de Gambrinus.

Jean, the heir apparent, will apparently succeed his father Jean-Pierre in running the brewery as of this March.

Cantillon owner Jean-Pierre Van Roy and me after our tour.

• • •

No Comments »

No comments yet.

Comments RSSTrackBack URI

Leave a comment

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Powered by: WordPress Owned by: Brookston Amalgamated Institute